Heritage Hotels Big Cat and Migration Updates

Wildlife Thrives In Naivasha

by sales@heritagehotels.co.ke

25 April 2014

All five zebras at the Great Rift Valley Lodge and Golf Resort are in good shape. They love the golf course and they have to be constantly shooed away for they love to wallow in the bunkers and destroy the greens with their hooves.

 

 

 

 

Pili, who is 14 months old is the only zebra who is injured. He hurt his right hind leg recently and was treated by KWS vet. He is improving but limping and although he does not suckle anymore, he follows his mother around.

The Migration In Naivasha

The Maasai Mara is famous for wildebeest but now on Crescent Island in Naivasha, there are herds of them and they move on the Island just as they do between Mara and Serengeti.

 

 

Crescent Island is also home to many other plains game like impalas, zebras, Grants’ gazelle, Thomson’s gazelle, waterbuck and others. It’s all the more reason to visit it while you’re staying at the Great Rift Valley Lodge and Golf Resort.

 

Crater Lake
Crater Lake near Lake Naivasha in the Great Rift Valley is home to a diversity of plains game and birds. When they are not nesting at Lake Natron in Tanzania, flocks of flamingos fly in to feed on the rich algae.

 

The lake is only 18 kilometers from the Great Rift Valley Lodge and ideal for day excursions. It’s great for hiking. A walk around the rim of the crater takes two hours. From the southern part of the crater you can see Lake Naivasha and Lake Oloiden which are just 100 meters apart. This is a game sanctuary that is worth visiting for the panoramic views and wildlife.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Heritage Hotels (Kenya) manages The Great Rift Valley Lodge and Golf Resort in Naivasha, just an hour an a half's drive from Nairobi. The lodge is famous for one the longest holes in Kenya - the par 5 -  17th ‘signature’ at 598 metres (654 yards)!

 ©Heritage Hotels Ltd, Kenya.

Why Mzee Pavo His Lost Feathers

by sales@heritagehotels.co.ke

25 April 2014

Mzee Pavo (the peacock) lost his feathers a month ago due to moulting.
Birds moult periodically, shedding old feathers for new. Feathers are dead structures which gradually need to be replaced. Adult birds can moult up to three times a year.
Moulting is a slow process because birds rarely shed all their feathers at once. A bird must retain sufficient feathers to regulate its body temperature and repel moisture. The number of feathers that are shed varies. In some moulting periods, a bird may renew only the feathers on the head and body, shedding the wing and tail feathers during a later moulting period.
Some species of birds become flightless during an annual "wing moult" and must seek a protected habitat with a reliable food supply during that time. While the plumage may appear thin or uneven during the moult, the bird's general shape is maintained despite the loss of feathers.

 

The process of moulting begins with the bird shedding some old feathers. The pin feathers replace the old feathers. As the pin feathers become full feathers, other feathers are shed.

 

The feather loss is equal on each side of the body.

 

 

Feathers make up 4–12% of a bird's body weight and it takes a large amount of energy to replace them. For this reason, moulting often occurs immediately after the breeding season, while food is still abundant. The plumage produced during this time is called postnuptial plumage.
Report by Daniel Kilonzo, Resident Naturalist at Great Rift Valley Lodge and Golf Resort. 

Heritage Hotels (Kenya) manages The Great Rift Valley Lodge and Golf Resort in Naivasha, just an hour an a half's drive from Nairobi. The lodge is famous for one the longest holes in Kenya - the par 5 -  17th ‘signature’ at 598 metres (654 yards)!
 ©Heritage Hotels Ltd, Kenya.